Should dado blades be banned in the U.S. too? Also on MORE MINUTES this week, I unbox my new Craftsman Air Compressor and pay homage to Quentin …

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42 COMENTÁRIOS

  1. So, by making long arbors hard to get, those with short arbors will be tempted to take chances with trying to squeeze a dado where none should go.

    Sounds like bureaucratic nonsense at it's finest.

    I think I'll start marketing long arbor table saws in europe. I see a market for them.

  2. Re Dado Blades, screw the nanny state. But I found this.

    Hi all

    The reason for dado blades being banned in the UK was initially due to the high number of people chopping serious bits out of fingers and hands and due to the nature of the injury, repairs were not usually very good! The EU Directives do then prohibit. The problem in using a dado blade many people do not make any form of guarding to compensate for removing the top/crown guard. Contrary to what everyone says about 'I'll be carefull' I had the pleasure of investigating dozens or hand injuries on table saws, spindles, radial arm saws, planers …… and in many – not all – cases guards were not in place or adequate. People do make mistakes – often.

    Please don't just mock elf n safety as if it is there to stop everyone doing what they want, the vast majority of the rules spring from real experience. In case you are interested I was one of Her Majesties Inspectors of Factories and responsible for enforcing the safety laws. The majority of silly stuff you read/hear about where health and safety is used as the excuse are usually total rubbish. In this case its for a good reason.

    Regarding the States and allowing dado blades – put the correct sticker on something and you suddenly find the litigation in America can disappear. Sadly, a sticker doesn't put your fingers back on. Use a router or spindle moulder?

    This post was edited by Geoffrey Laycock on 15.05.2012, 19:06 o’clock
    Reason: typos

  3. I had to listen a second time…!!! You said “Oil” filter… Did you mean Air Filter since it is at the upper end of the Pump Head…? Your air compressor gauges are there for the safety of you and your shop. The Tank Guage, The larger one I believe shows how much is always in your compressor tank Pounds per square inch(PSI). The Tool gauge smaller one is Regulated air for your tools… Some tools require more (PSI) than others…. You do Not use more PSI Than your tool is deigned for… You dial up or down as needed.(Safety First)…One example could be used if your Nail Gun or Staple Gun did not have a depth Adjustment then you could dial down the (PSI) to regulate the set of the nail or staple… Greg

  4. HAHA!!! Steve, I've had that same model air compressor for five years, and ZERO issues.
    Okay, I did get mine from the flea market for twenty bucks because the guy that owned it first dropped the thing off a building or something (he said) and broke the regulator… Since I had one laying around and a couple gauges (of dubious function of course) I just slapped it in there and went for it.
    Ordinarily, I have little to say about Craftsman… not because they're inherently wrong or bad… Just I have little to say about them as a brand. BUT I will say, that is a damn decent compressor (in all likelihood).

    AND surely, you do know how the pressure regulator works…

    AND yes… at least on concrete floors, mine wanders around the floor too. I usually use a regular 25' blue or orange air-hose coiled around the thing to inhibit that… mostly because I can find those pretty cheap and consistently at the flea market, too.

    I will recommend you keep the thing indoors during cold weather. They are prone to letting the oil "go jelly" if you leave them exposed… BUT I've consistently been able to thaw mine out and have it running without trouble. It's not like freezing is a "death sentence" automatically or anything… just inconvenient as hell when you need to fill a tire to get on the road. ;o)

  5. Hello, Steve, in regard to the employment of Dado cutters under (UK) law, there are no specific precedents for using same in the domestic workshop; however, in terms of factory produced box jointed cutting (one assumes, on an industrial scale – or for, say, the furniture/cabinet making market), there are clear working practices – & thereby, strict regulations – to ensure safe production of the aforementioned. Europe does sell these cutters, but as in the US, they are considerably expensive. My situation is further compounded by the fact that owning a cordless (portable) table saw, I only have one guide rail – so a specifically designed sled would need to be created to accommodate such; second, the arbour on my table saw is too short to handle wider-set Dado cutting, therefore the principle in this case, is redundant. The only way I can make box joints, effectively, is to employ my router (& I need to construct a table to house the power unit) ….ah well…time to build. Thank you for another excellent presentation 😀