[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCB0YdoScn8?rel=0&autoplay=1&autoplay=1&modestbranding=1&w=580&h=385]

I asked for your tool maintenance tips on Patreon and Twitter. Here are some of your answers and here are a couple things I recommend ➤ My sharpening stone thing. I LOVE THIS TOOL! Work…

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32 COMENTÁRIOS

  1. On the topic of lending tools – Here in Germany the sunday is kind of sacred. You are hold to not making noise. At least not the kind of noise tools like a lawnmower or a chainsaw make. If you live in a small village in a rural area things are different. Some sunday a neighbor showed up and asked me for my chainsaws. The whole sunday, you could see him make firewood. On monday I got my saws back, freshly cleaned, with new oil and a tank full of gasoline in them. The chains were also freshly sharpend.

  2. In a woodshop, lubes are tricky…dry teflon lubes are awesome but they interfere with finishes. WD40 is not a lubricant! It works for very short term, but when you spray it in a bearing, etc. it is just reconstituting the old caked grease…..so you think it's actually lubricating. The real intended use is to displace water. LPS is probably what you want for actual rust protection, while still lubing the actual moving parts. LPS2 is good for table saw tops, etc. but you have to let it dry to keep it from collecting dust.

  3. What I would like from experienced people like you is…

    Specific directions on what to buy. Sometimes people want to say you can use this. but others have found that works well….

    You've done it long enough to have opinions and recommendations, so…

    This is the chisel set I got; this is the router I use; this is the glue product; this is my table saw; get that bit set; etc.

    You've already figured it out. We who are new to it can hit the ground running.

  4. Steve, the camera is to high in this video. The chalk works as I've been using this for many years. WD40 is not a lube. It will cause the hinge or bearing to attract dust and dirt. It is good to stop squeaks for a time but they will come back along with a dirty hinge.I keep all of my tool bases like the table saw coated with a paste wax. This not only decreases the chances of rust, but keeps things sliding nice. Loan your tools to a neighbor????? Only if he knows how to use it. Had a law suit here reciently and the loaner paid a lot for the stupidity of the neighbor. So be careful!!!!! I eliminated 99% of the snipe in my thickness planer by building a table that fits into the throat of the planer and extends 4 feet in front and behind the cutter. This only nakes you loose 3/4 inch of thickness but lets you have the potential of placing guides on the board to use in planing narrow pieces on their sides. Like a 1 X 4 that you want to have the right width and you have 20 of them. If you "nick" the blades usually you will "nick" all of the blades (usually 2 or 3 blades). If you have good sharp "nicked" blades there is room in the mounting space to (usually) move the blades side to side (usually not more than 1/8 inch) but this is enough to offset the blades and make the "nick" go away. I have done this several times when I was not as smart as I should have been. Sand the tables, then clean thee tables , and finally wax them. This keeps moisture away and makes the wood to glide better…I never use WD40 for anything but cleaning. Do you know where the WD and the 40 came from??? The WD was for "water defense and the 40 was from the 40th chemecal formula as they had failed in the first 39 tries.

  5. Thanks Steve and Wyatt. I have a small plexi cutter that's about the size of a pencil that I use. It was only a few dollars. You can put a yardstick or other guide onto plexi for a straight cut or do a curved cut without it. You just make several passes over the same line and then snap it off like glass. There's very little debris and I just use fine grit sandpaper for the edges. I made a couple strips to clamp sheet music down on windy days and it's great because you can see through it.WD40 will eventually dissolve fishing line so watch getting it on certain plastics. If you're doing anything that comes into contact with food using food grade mineral oil or glycerin might be better options. Glycerin is good for conditioning rubber if you ever need to.

  6. Magnets! Always an attratvie solution. I do what you suggested and use them for all kinds of other uses. Good for holing the scres and etc while you take something apart, or as third hands, thin disk magnets are great if you have a battery that doesn't quite connect. I have lots of magnets, 1000s of them, cheap on ebay. I have a few that scare the hell out of me, you have to be real real careful with ones that get up into the 200-500 lbs pull. You don't want to catch various parts of your body between it and a chunk of metal.

  7. Here in Minnesota we have issues with rust on EVERYTHING. Especially cars with all the salt the state uses on roads. I use giant silica packets, dehumidifier, and oil on all my tools. Seems to work well. My problem is buying used tools. Usually bolts and screws are seized from rust. A little penetrating fluid and time, they come right out. Sometimes I strip them and have to cut a slit or use speedouts. Pain in the butt. So it's better to protect them from the start. If I get one that's rusty I take it apart and clean it all, also replace the really rusty parts. Even if it's not needed. Preventative maintenance!!