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42 COMENTÁRIOS

  1. I agree with you about blade guards being obtrusive. For me, the blade guard makes the saw more dangerous. I need to see the blade and what is happening with the kerf. If somebody came up with a guard that wasn't so obstructive I would use it. I am definitely in favor of safety and love features like the riving knife because of its simplicity and non-interfering location. I sure wish that I could afford a SawStop table saw.

  2. I've never used riving knives or blade gaurds or any of that crap.
    The best thing you can do is just learn how to use a tool properly.
    And realize which pieces of wood might bind or not bind.
    The only time I've ever thought a riving knife would be nice was on a bandsaw…and they don't have them.
    A tablesaw simply doesn't need one.
    I've made many thousands of cuts and never needed one.

    Often the first step of getting a new tool is removing all the extra "safety" additions.

  3. I would like to see how to make cuts of different angles on a small piece of wood. My goal is to make a spherical chess board. Yes I know this is really advanced wood working skills but Im always told I think way too big. Thanks for the tips, tricks, guidance and laughs.

  4. As a newbie have thoroughly enjoyed your videos. You give such wonderful tips. I thought I had subscribed to you a while back, but I didn't, so I just did. I'm looking forward to finding more. Is it okay to be in love with you? I'm a 70 year old lady who is just learning. Seriously though, thanks for all you do. I might have to get that thingy you advertise.

  5. Just because their no guard does not mean 1: Ill fall off the so called protected area , 2: Ill cut my fingers off 3: it truly is protecting me. 4… etc.. Leaving my guard on? 1: Guarantees Ill not fall off the so called protected area. 2: guarantees Ill not cut my digits off 3: Guarantees protection. 4 etc.. Here is is the real truth. If your SMART and SAFE. you will probably be okay. otherwise. YMMV. simple as that,. yes Luck my play a factor. but Smart Safe people dont rely on luck= Back in the early 1900's their were plenty of smart people. … Plenty of dumb ones too. (see missing digits if their still alive). today? less smart people. and more dumb ones. (see missing digits.) ME? I still have all mine. the old saying is still true. YOU CANT FIX STUPID! even with a blade guard.

  6. Had to rob the honeybees for some wax a few years ago to put on the table saw. It was all we could find in a pinch. We hadn't used it in years and was almost un usable and dangerous before we applied it. That wax is what we use today because it works great and who is going to remember to buy something like that ahead of time?

  7. Hi Steve, I love your videos, you are so enthusiastic about what you do. You explain it so well just like 'Norm" used to do. Something you mentioned in the video was that you can't cut curves with a table saw. I'm sure you already know that if you feed your wood in diagonally between two auxiliary fences you can make a curved curf cut. Carry on getting us all more interested in more wood working!

  8. I don't use a blade guard, and I don't know anyone who does. Anything that interferes with handling the work, or visually obscures the work, is a safety negative, and that is what blade guards do. Otherwise I would use one. I have tried working with the guard in place and found it awkward and frustrating.
    Nor do I act the fool when operating the saw. Anyone who is reckless, well, I won't say deserves an injury but it would hardly be a surprise. Darwin's bitch is always present, ready to take a finger off a moron. Life in general is not easy for morons, that's the way it is. Too bad.
    The trade-off is a personal decision and I take personal responsibility for it. If ever I do injure myself using the saw, an injury the guard would have prevented that is, I won't be looking to sue the saw manufacturer.

  9. BTW, my saw has a miter on a moving table section for cross cuts, instead of mounting the miter on a runner.
    Yes, it's a Ryobi BT3000. No, I'm not in the BT3000 cult – I got this from my brother years ago when he went to prison for murdering the designer of the Ryobi BT3000. Beat him to death with the blade guard.
    Looked like an accident to me, but the DA didn't see it that way. Hey – it's a mad world. Maybe I should give him the saw, then we'll see what he thinks.
    So a sled can't help me. I just have to get off my wallet and buy a good normal cast iron table saw.

  10. If your blade guard is a problem say "Time to expose the blade!" It doesn't sound as smart. I had a Delta over arm guard I got free as a throw in on an auction for a fence from a cabinet shop liquidating that worked great. The problem with many guards is that is a lot of stuff on the splitter to allow both to work effectively and thin cuts are close to the fence. More than finger amputation, the guard keeps dust heading down into the machine dust collection and debris that could be dangerous down.